Tag Archives: in home dog training

Beginning Sit and Touching Exercises Plus Fetch

First in home training class demonstrating Sit, touching drills, and beginning the Fetch or retrieve.

Wolfhound Muzzle Touch
Wolfhound Muzzle Touch

We are back with the wolfhound from Anaheim Hills in Orange County. This in home training class presented some unique challenges. I did modify some of my standard techniques, however I don’t show many of these modification in the video. I feel most people will benefit more by seeing how the drills are usually taught.

We’ll begin with the sit with food drill. I go over the sit for food drill quickly. If you need to see how I do the beginning sit drill you may need to reference some of my other videos. During the sit exercise I go over taking the food gently from the owner’s hand. Forceful grabbing of food can be a problem for many dogs and there are several ways to work through over exuberant grabbing. Since this dog was grabbing the food in a frantic and unfocused way I recommend only rewarding gentle and focused food taking.

Next in the video I go over touching exercises using food as a distraction and reward. The touching exercises are part of the foundation exercises I teach. Touching drills teach the dog to be calmer when interacting with people and they teach the dog to like being touched in ways the untrained dog may find objectionable. The touching exercises are also helpful for working through avoidance behavior. Often it’s necessary to work past avoidance before a dog will reliably come on command.

The two touching drills I cover towards the beginning of the video are the muzzle touch and the occipital ridge (top of the head) touch. I mention the shoulder touch at the end of the video.

After we work on the touch drills we go outside where we learn how touch exercise can be applied to practical everyday situations.

Wolfhound Fetch Orienting dog to retrieve / chew toy
Wolfhound Fetch Orienting dog to retrieve / chew toy

Before I work on focusing the dog to its retrieve / chew toy I go over what kind of toy I would like this dog to have.

Some dogs really like to retrieve and some don’t. You’ll see my new big dog friend in not too thrilled about chasing and getting a toy some strange human is playing with. But, there is a little interest and that’s all we need. Follow the directions, even if your dog only shows a little interest in the toy and you will have a retriever in no time.

With my in home dog training videos I always try to have a little commentary by the owners. After the owner commentary I go over the shoulder touch. The shoulder touch can be a very useful exercise for out of control, hyper dogs as well as fearful or sensitive dogs.

This video and blog post took over 10 hours to complete so if you like it at all I would greatly appreciate a G+ if you have a Google account. If you don’t use Google I also like FaceBook likes and shares as well as twitter posts. Thanks for your support.

Wishing you the best in dogs and the best in life,
Andrew Ledford
So Cal Dog training
714-827-4058

I mainly serve Orange County, Long Beach, the San Gabriela Valley, Los Angeles Westside, South Bay, and the LA metro area. I do training throughout Southern California and have worked dogs as far north as San Francisco and East into Arizona. I am also open to teaching abroad. I have done some training in Taiwan.

P.S.

If you leave a comment and would like to change it or have it deleted just let me know and I will take care of it as soon as I can

 

Don’t Touch Command

Here is the second part of the first in-home class with a dog from the Anaheim Hills of Orange County.

Teaching The Off Command
Teaching The Off Command

The video starts with teaching my new tail wagging friend the “Off” command. In the beginning we will use a two second hold between the command and the dog getting a food reward. By teaching “Off”, the dog will learn to focus and not touch during the holding period. After the holding period is over the dog need to hear the “Take” command before it can take the food. For future training it’s important that we count out loud. I try to put each part of the exercise on a verbal cue. By doing this you’ll have better command control of the dog.

There is also a part in the video where I show and explain a very helpful form of touching that can be used to calm an active dog.

So you can hear what the owner thought of the drill I included a little of the owner’s commentary. In this part, one of the owners talks a bit about how they think the exercise will work compared to what they have been doing.

The last part of the video is where I go over how to use positioning and touch/petting to get a dog to quit jumping. While I go over using the touch/petting technique for this drill you can also use food as the reward. As a bonus tip I also included an important safety procedure that should always be done when implementing the step back positioning drill.

Are you wondering about the potty conversation that was started and interrupted at the beginning of the positioning part of the video? To answer the burning question what happened, yes the dog did potty in the designated spot. Yay!

If you learned anything at all or find this post and video at all helpful could you please give it a G+ if you have a Google account? It would also be nice if you could share it on FaceBook especially if you don’t do Google.

Wishing you the best in dogs and the best in life,

Andrew Ledford
So Cal Dog training
714-827-4058
I mainly serve Orange County, Long Beach, the San Gabriela Valley, Los Angeles Westside, South Bay, and the LA metro area

Evaluation of Wolfhound Puppy

Wolfhound Greeting Before Training Lesson
Wolfhound Greeting Before Training Lesson

The video shows my initial meeting with this Wolfhound puppy and the beginning part of the first lesson. On this day we are training in the Anaheim Hills of Orange County. I start with a short evaluation. The video doesn’t show the whole behavioral evaluation but it will give you a glimpse of the initial assessment. You’ll notice this dog is quite passive, and active. Wolfhounds are usually not quite this active.

The next part of the video briefly shows the yard and environmental evaluation. In this part of the training I check the yard for safety hazards and other possible problems. I then talk to the owner about some common plants that could be a problem for the dog. When doing a yard check I’m also looking for a good potty area and checking the fence line.

In the next video we’ll begin some of the foundation training. The training process is part of a system, each component of the lesson has a purpose and is important. Even seemingly trivial points have a purpose. I believe all of my videos with the possible exception of the two Goldendoodles contain at least one important training technique or principle. The Goldendoodle video was just for fun. It was more an experimental video where I attached a camera to one of the dogs.

I’m wishing you the best in dogs and the best in life,
Andrew Ledford
So Cal Dog training
714-827-4058

Taking Real Bone From Resource Guarding Dog

Results of an in home dog training program showing the owner taking a high value bone from the dog
Results of an in home dog training program showing the owner taking a high value bone from the dog

Don’t try this at home. This is for entertainment purposes only. If your dog shows any signs of aggression consult with an experienced dog trainer. Don’t attempt to correct aggression problems by yourself.

This is the second part to the video showing the results of training a boxer dog with low level resource guarding. We started training with low value toys. The next step was to teach the dog to let people take its rawhide bones. Finally we have reached a point where we can take a real bone from the dog.

Man Training Dog With a High value Resource - Bone
Man Training Dog With a High value Resource – Bone

In the previous post and video you got to see me taking the bone, now you’ll get to see how the dog does with its owners. I’m in the first few seconds of the video but then the owners come onto the picture.

Most of the videos I do are hopefully going to be rather mild as far as violence goes. I try to work below the threshold of aggression. Working a dog below the threshold of aggression is something I can do most of the time. Confrontations do occur, but I try to keep them to a minimum.

If you like to see growling dogs I may have a video coming soon with a bit more growling. I have not decided if I am going to post it or not. In that video the dog is growling when we first meet. More than half of that first lesson was growling. Fortunately, so far I have not had any growling while I’ve had the leash in my hands.

More video of the boxer dog giving up a high value beef bone. I’m coaching the owners as they work the dog. But this time the video is also showing the owners working the dog and taking its bone.

Wishing you the best in dogs and in life,
Andrew Ledford
Southern California Dog training
714-827-4058

Resource Guarding Taking a Real Beef Bone From Dog

Dog Training High With a Value Resource The Real Bone
Dog Training High With a Value Resource The Real Bone

Here is a follow up blog post and video showing the results of an in home training program with the boxer dog who had low level resource guarding.

Don’t try this a home. This is for entertainment purposes only. In this video I get a quick update on how the dog is doing with dropping and giving up toys as well as things it steals.

Then the big unboxing of the beef bone. It’s really more like unwrapping. I prepare the bone for training and then it’s test time.

Dog Training Resource Guarding With The Real Bone
Dog Training Resource Guarding With The Real Bone

Will all the training we worked so hard on pay off? Will this boxer be a good boy or will he bite the hand that feeds him?

The remainder of the video is me working the dog. I will be performing several different techniques during the training lesson. The primary goal is to take the high value resource (bone) from the dog without aggressive or possessive behavior. I expect him to “react” to the command by letting me have the bone and taking the food treat. You will notice that I do use techniques other than just taking the bone to make the dog feel more secure in this type of competitive scenario.

While this is the big day and in some ways a test for how the dog is doing, it is still a training session. That is why I’m taking the bone and not the owners. Usually I’ll work the dog before I have the owner do the drills. During most training sessions you will see me handling the dog first. Don’t miss the upcoming video. The next video in the series will show the owners taking the bone from the dog. Since we are still doing training with this dog the dog is kept on leash. I explain a little about keeping the dog on its leash toward the end of the video.

Stay tuned for the next video, same dog channel (site) maybe a different dog time. This video was done in Orange County California. So far I have not established a release day or blog/video schedule. I have been doing at least one new blog post and video a week, sometimes I do more than one. It takes a considerable amount of time to do some of the edits so I can’t do too many. A five minute video and blog post can take between 5 to 20 hours to complete. It depends on how it was shot. Most of these posts + videos take a fairly long time to shoot, and edit. Writing the post is usually not that time consuming. They are short and typically highlight what the video is about.

Wishing you the best in dogs and in life,
Andrew Ledford
Southern California Dog training
714-827-4058

Video Remedial Sit With In Home Dog Program

Showing a dog training around distractions in the act of sitting
Showing a dog training around distractions in the act of sitting

One of the great things about in home dog training is that we can go back over previously learned skills when needed. In this video I will cover the beginning Sit using the leash and collar. While I am using a slip collar in the video you can do this with any type of collar. The technique even works with a head collar such as a gentle leader. Another advantage of a series of in home lessons is that they help reinforce previously learned material and techniques.

Hand Position For Training Dogs to Sit Using the Leash and Collar

Thought this video you will notice that distractions affect humans as well as dogs. When distractions are combined with the extra stress of working in public, performing fine grained behaviors can be more difficult. It may not seem like following directions, such as having the dog sit, would be difficult. But add some big flying bird, and the whole scenario changes.

Since timing is one of the most important parts of dog training you will notice that I repeat myself until I get the response we need. That is unless the situation has changed enough that the behavior I was targeting is no longer the best response.

From doing these videos I think I may go back to a more formal and traditional obedience training format for giving instructions to the dog handler. I think these videos are a great learning tool for everyone.

The video starts with a little information that could prevent you from injuring your dog. It then moves to leash handling and the actual technique. I have developed a step by step training system so that anyone can learn to control their dog. Even if you don’t have the best timing or coordination. If you practice and follow each step you will be able to train your dog.

Next you will see me walk the handler through doing the exercise properly. Towards the end I get a report on how the dog is doing with giving its special high value bone. You will see in this video we are still training in Irvine.

We provide training services to all of Orange County, Long Beach, and the Los Angeles metro areas including the San Gabriel Valley, South Bay, and West Side. Adaptive Dog Training™ conveniently offers customized In home training to a large portion of Southern California’s most dog friendly communities. 714-827-4058

Wishing you the best in dogs and in life

Working Dog in Irvine with Ducks and Geese

Double Handling While Training with Distractions
Double Handling While Training with Distractions

Dog training Video 2 and my Boxer friend at Irvine park. The Irvine area of Orange County has some good dog training locations. We are still training with the ducks and geese as distractions.

This video is the second in a series of three and has some good dog obedience training advice, but I feel it’s a little less interesting than the other two videos. The advice in these videos will be most relevant to those who are involved in one of my training programs. This training session is part of a customized in home training program.

In this video you’ll get to see me do some double handling to get the dog to sit. Towards the end I will also point out when the owner makes a subtle movement that sets the dog up to perform the desired behavior.

Let me know if there is something that will make these videos more useful for you.

 

Teaching a Boxer Dog with Ducks and Geese

In Home Dog Training With a Boxer Dog
In Home Dog Training With a Boxer Dog

In this video you will see an in home dog training lesson with a reactive boxer. This dog is not terribly aggressive but he does react to big birds taking flight. On this day we are training at Heritage Park in Irvine California. This is the first part of a thee part video series. We begin with our arrival at the park and a critique of previously learned training techniques. Including a crisp and precise about turn and the two leash grips I most commonly use. You’ll also get to see the change of pace exercise used to keep the dog’s attention in distracting environments.

In the video I go over some personal equipment requirements and how it relates to safety. Along with this I go over techniques that make executing commonly use training movements safer. One thing I don’t mention in the video but it is important is if you are moving quickly such as running don’t do a square left turn or you are likely to fall over your dog. I did add it as annotation in the video. Left turns should be done as a deliberate and precise movement even when moving at a normal pace. If you have good knees and a good back you can probably get away with doing a square right turn at a fairly quick pace.

In Home Dog Training at the Park  With Geese
In Home Dog Training at the Park With Geese

There is a little control issue when the dog wants to bolt after a flock of flying geese. It’s at this point that I go over how to use a stable stance to control the dog. In this section of the video I explain what good body positioning for control should look like. Good body positioning is especially helpful when the dog is getting out of control.

It’s sometimes easier to know what needs to be done than to actually perform the technique when needed. The reason I give specific drills is so the dog handler will have the behavior in their repertoire at a moments notice. One should be able to react without thinking too much about what needs to be done.

Throughout the video I encourage dog handlers to be aware if their dog. I actually edited most of this information out because there were too many children in that part of the video. However, you should focus on what is important and not be distracted by superficial events.

Training a terripoo poodle terrier

Here is a short video of a very active terripoo walking on a loose leash. This is from an in home dog training lesson. We even walked by a barking dog without much of a problem. This is a big accomplishment for such a happy and excitable young dog. I expect this dog will be doing much better with barking dog the next time I see it.

You will notice I do use leash prompts when training dogs. I think most people will have no problem using the leash in this manner. For those who do not like the leash prompt a well conditioned Heel taught with food can accomplish the same thing.

Dog Sitting waiting to have the leash put on

Teach your dog to Sit before you put it on the leash

Managing dog behavior and people’s too


Encourage good dog behavior with the appropriate discriminative stimuli

Is managing discriminative stimuli part of philosophy, business management, or dog training? This is what Wikipedia has to say about “Stimulus control and discriminative stimuli: Stimulus control is the phenomenon of a stimulus increasing the probability of a behavior (operant response) because of a history of that behavior being differentially reinforced in the presence of the stimulus. In other words, stimulus control is basically learning to pay attention to things that we identify in the environment (discriminative stimuli) that give us information about the effectiveness of our behavior.” Discriminative stimuli help us determine what rules apply to achieve reinforcement.

At a social media group I belong to I was talking with a philosopher about how we have certain rules that help us do the right thing. More importantly we have rules that keep us from doing what society considered immoral. This part of the conversation revolved around how a man of good moral character would not go to an attractive married woman’s room where they are alone and drink alcohol while at a conference.

Why is it that alcohol is a major factor or variable to this scenario? It could be that alcohol reduces the inhibition we associate with moral behavior. By reducing inhibitions our more animal like nature shines through. The nature of animals is probably driven more by lower level needs than the higher level needs we like to associate with being human. At this point my post diverged into two different lines of thought. I will post my more whimsical thoughts about the possibilities of animals experiencing altered states of consciousness on my new dog website.

Getting back to dog training and behavior management. If we can’t expect other humans, not to mention ourselves, to behave properly under certain conditions, how can we expect our dogs to do any better?  For the most part dogs don’t have the ability to manage discriminative stimuli that control behavior.

The inability of dogs to control this aspect of their environment places the responsibility of discriminative stimuli management squarely on the shoulders of us humans.

We need to live by rules that help arrange the environment in ways where dogs have an easy time being good. Dogs can’t decide I’m going to spend more time inside so I won’t be so tempted to go visit my neighbor when she smells sooo good because it would lead to a show dog with less than desirable children. But people can arrange the environment so our dogs are not hated by society.

Some interesting strategies for self control were used by children in an experiment that required waiting 15 minutes to have 2 sweets verses having 1 sweet right away. It was found that children with good self control employed a strategy of not thinking about the sweet. This was often done by thinking about something else. They were managing the internal discriminative stimuli. These children were managing the signals that controlled their behavior. I like calling internal discriminative stimuli the controlling signal(s). It may not be scientific but it makes sense for normal conversations.

Managing discriminative stimuli or the controlling signal(s) is often one of my first objectives when doing an in home dog training program. Discriminative stimuli management is especially critical where the owner is so frustrated with the dog’s behavior they are thinking about getting rid of the dog.  Usually we can at least make the dog’s behavior good enough so the owner can keep the dog. This give us time to do the needed training to change the offending behavior. Now even if the behavior can’t be completely changed, it usually can be managed. Efficient management of the dog’s behavior can make cohabitation with humans possible.

There are established social rules for managing the attractive woman + Alcohol + opportunity syndrome.  There are also individuals who have personal rules for managing these scenarios. With dogs you need to be your dog’s social authority. It’s important to know that you can direct and manage your dog’s behavior without being overbearing. Sometimes this involves teaching a new response. At other times you may need to make some physical changes to the environment. It is up to you, the dog’s owner, to manage the signals that control your dog’s behavior.

I can be reached at 714-827-4058